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Behaviour, Disputes and Discipline

 

Objectives

 This guide is designed to meet the following objectives

  • To ensure the safe and professional conduct of all Brisbane North Junior Cricket Association (BNJCA) cricket events
  • To ensure the Code of Conduct Policy is adhered to
  • To minimise alcohol related incidents and harm to participants, property, spectators and general community
  • To improve and preserve the reputation of BNJCA to people in the general community

 

 

Spirit of Cricket

 

Cricket is a game that owes much of its unique appeal to the fact that it should be played not only within its Laws but also within the Spirit of the Game. Any action which is seen to abuse this spirit causes injury to the game itself. The major responsibility for ensuring the spirit of fair play rests with the captains.

 

1. There are two Laws which place the responsibility for the team's conduct firmly on the captain.

 

Law 1.4 Responsibility of captains

The captains are responsible at all times for ensuring that play is conducted within the Spirit of the Game as well as within the Laws.

 

Law 42 Player's conduct

In the event of a player failing to comply with instructions by an umpire, or criticising by word or action the decisions of an umpire, or showing dissent, or generally behaving in a manner which might bring the game into disrepute, the umpire concerned shall in the first place report the matter to the other umpire and to the player's captain, and instruct the latter to take action.

 

2. Fair and unfair play

According to the Laws the umpires are the sole judges of fair and unfair play. The umpires may intervene at any time and it is the responsibility of the captain to take action where required.

 

3. The umpires are authorised to intervene in cases of:

  • Time wasting
  • Damaging the pitch
  • Dangerous or unfair bowling
  • Tampering with the ball
  • Any other action that they consider to be unfair

 

4. The Spirit of the Game involves RESPECT for:

  • Your opponents
  • Your own captain and team
  • The role of the umpires
  • The game's traditional values

 

5. It is against the Spirit of the Game:

  • To dispute an umpire's decision by word, action or gesture
  • To direct abusive language towards an opponent or umpire
  • To indulge in cheating or any sharp practice, for instance:
    • to appeal knowing that the batsman is not out
    • to advance towards an umpire in an aggressive manner when appealing 
    • to seek to distract an opponent either verbally or by harassment with persistent clapping or unnecessary noise under the guise of enthusiasm and motivation of one's own side

 

6. Violence

There is no place for any act of violence on the field of play.

 

7. Players

Captains and umpires together set the tone for the conduct of a cricket match. Every player is expected to make an important contribution to this.

 

 

Codes of Conduct

 

This code of conduct applies to Players, Officials and Parents and is categorised by the level of the offense both as a guide for clubs to impose their own sanctions and as a guide for the BNJCA Dispute and Discipline Committee in applying sanctions where agreement cannot be found between clubs.

 

Level 1 Offences

  • Abuse of cricket equipment or clothing, ground equipment or fixtures and fittings during a Match.
  • Showing dissent at an Umpire’s decision during a Match.
  • Using language or a gesture that is obscene, offensive or insulting during a Match.
  • Excessive appealing during a Match.
  • Pointing or gesturing towards the pavilion by a bowler or other member of the fielding side upon the dismissal of a batsman during a Match.

 

Level 2 Offences

  • Showing serious dissent at an Umpire’s decision during a Match.
  • Inappropriate and deliberate physical contact with Players, Officials, Parents or third person, either in the course of play during a Match or during the periods before or after play at the relevant venue.
  • Charging or advancing towards the Umpire in an aggressive manner when appealing during a Match.
  • Deliberate and malicious distraction or obstruction of a Player or Official on the field of play during a Match.
  • Using language or gesture(s) that is seriously obscene, seriously offensive or of a seriously insulting nature to another Player, Official, Parent or any other third person during a Match.
  • Changing the condition of the ball in breach of Law 42.3 of the Laws of Cricket.
  • Any attempt to manipulate a Match for inappropriate strategic or tactical reasons.
  • Throwing a ball (or any other item of cricket equipment such as a water bottle) at or near a Player, Official, Parent or any other third person in an inappropriate and/or dangerous manner during a Match.
  • Where the facts of the alleged incident are not adequately or clearly covered by any of the above offences, conduct at any time that either: (a) is contrary to the spirit of the game; (b) is unbecoming of a Player, Official or Parent; (c) is or could be harmful to the interests of cricket; or (d) does or could bring the game of cricket into disrepute.

 

Level 3 Offences

  • Intimidation or attempted intimidation of an Umpire whether by language or behaviour (including gestures) during a Match.
  • Threat of assault on another Player, Official, Parent or any other person (including a spectator) during a Match.
  • Use language or gestures that offend, insult, humiliate, intimidate, threaten, disparage or vilify another person on the basis of that person’s race, religion, gender, colour, descent, sexuality or national or ethnic origin.
  • Where the facts of the alleged incident are not adequately or clearly covered by any of the above offences, conduct at any time that either: (a) is contrary to the spirit of the game; (b) is unbecoming of a Player, Official or Parent; (c) is or could be harmful to the interests of cricket; or (d) does or could bring the game of cricket into disrepute.

 

Level 4 Offences

  • Threat of assault on an Umpire during a Match.
  • Physical assault of another Player, Official, Parent or any other person (including a spectator) during a Match.
  • Any act of violence on the field of play during a Match.
  • Use language or gestures that seriously offend, insult, humiliate, intimidate, threaten, disparage or vilify another person on the basis of that person’s race, religion, gender, colour, sexuality or national or ethnic origin.
  • Where the facts of the alleged incident are not adequately or clearly covered by any of the above offences, conduct at any time that either: (a) is contrary to the spirit of the game; (b) is unbecoming of a Player, Official or Parent; (c) is or could be harmful to the interests of cricket; or (d) does or could bring the game of cricket into disrepute.

 

 

Australian Sports Commission Codes of Behaviour

 

BNJCA also fully endorses the following Australian Sports Commission (ASC) Codes of Behaviour for Junior Sport.

 

ASC Code of Behaviour - Players

  • Play by the rules. 
  • Never argue with an official. If you disagree, have your captain, coach or manager approach the official during a break or after the competition. 
  • Control your temper. Verbal abuse of officials and sledging other players, deliberately distracting or provoking an opponent are not acceptable or permitted behaviours in any sport. 
  • Work equally hard for yourself and/or your team. Your team’s performance will benefit; so will you. 
  • Be a good sport. Applaud all good plays whether they are made by your team or the opposition. 
  • Treat all participants in your sport as you like to be treated. Do not bully or take unfair advantage of another competitor. 
  • Cooperate with your coach, team mates and opponents. Without them there would be no competition. 
  • Participate for your own enjoyment and benefit, not just to please parents and coaches. 
  • Respect the rights, dignity and worth of all participants regardless of their gender, ability, cultural background or religion. 

 

ASC Code of Behaviour - Parents

  • Remember that children participate in sport for their enjoyment, not yours. 
  • Encourage children to participate, do not force them. 
  • Focus on the child’s efforts and performance rather than winning or losing. 
  • Encourage children always to play according to the rules and to settle disagreements without resorting to hostility or violence. 
  • Never ridicule or yell at a child for making a mistake or losing a competition. 
  • Remember that children learn best by example. Appreciate good performances and skilful plays by all participants. 
  • Support all efforts to remove verbal and physical abuse from sporting activities. 
  • Respect officials’ decisions and teach children to do likewise. 
  • Show appreciation for volunteer coaches, officials and administrators. Without them, your child could not participate. 
  • Respect the rights, dignity and worth of every young person regardless of their gender, ability, cultural background or religion. 

 

ASC Code of Behaviour - Coaches

  • Remember that young people participate for pleasure and winning are only part of the fun. 
  • Never ridicule or yell at a young player for making a mistake or not coming first. 
  • Be reasonable in your demands on players’ time, energy and enthusiasm. 
  • Operate within the rules and spirit of your sport and teach your players to do the same. 
  • Ensure that the time players spend with you is a positive experience.  All young people are deserving of equal attention and opportunities. 
  • Avoid overplaying the talented players; the just average need and deserve equal time. 
  • Ensure that equipment and facilities meet safety standards and are appropriate to the age and ability of all players. 
  • Display control, respect and professionalism to all involved with the sport. This includes opponents, coaches, officials, administrators, the media, parents and spectators. Encourage your players to do the same. 
  • Show concern and caution toward sick and injured players. Follow the advice of a physician when determining whether an injured player is ready to recommence training or competition. 
  • Obtain appropriate qualifications and keep up to date with the latest coaching practices and the principles of growth and development of young people. 
  • Any physical contact with a young person should be appropriate to the situation and necessary for the player’s skill development. 
  • Respect the rights, dignity and worth of every young person regardless of their gender, ability, cultural background or religion. 

 

ASC Code of Behaviour - Administrators 

  • Involve young people in planning, leadership, evaluation and decision making related to the activity. 
  • Give all young people equal opportunities to participate. 
  • Create pathways for young people to participate in sport not just as a player but as a coach, referee, administrator etc. 
  • Ensure that rules, equipment, length of games and training schedules are modified to suit the age, ability and maturity level of young players. 
  • Provide quality supervision and instruction for junior players. 
  • Remember that young people participate for their enjoyment and benefit. Do not overemphasise awards. 
  • Help coaches and officials highlight appropriate behaviour and skill development, and help improve the standards of coaching and officiating. 
  • Ensure that everyone involved in junior sport emphasises fair play, and not winning at all costs. 
  • Give a code of behaviour sheet to spectators, officials, parents, coaches, players and the media, and encourage them to follow it. 
  • Remember, you set an example. Your behaviour and comments should be positive and supportive. 
  • Make it clear that abusing young people in any way is unacceptable and will result in disciplinary action. 
  • Respect the rights, dignity and worth of every young person regardless of their gender, ability, cultural background or religion. 

 

 

BNJCA Guidelines on the use of Drugs

 

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BNJCA Guidelines on the use of Alcohol

 

The BNJCA Management Committee has established these guidelines relating to the use or consumption of alcohol by any person involved in BNJCA events. It is vital that strict guidelines are put in place to ensure that any Cricket events or fixtures are not marred by impaired and/or unsafe performances, or negatively affected from unruly behaviour related to the consumption of liquor.

 

The following guidelines outline procedures for the consumption of alcohol and outline punishments for any breach of these guidelines.

 

Participant involvement

 

No participants, including coach, manager, scorer, umpire or player, will be permitted to compete in any BNJCA event if he/she is consuming alcohol or suffering the obvious effects of alcohol. Any such person/s will be asked to leave the sporting arena by the affiliated club appointed grounds official.

 

Refusal to cooperate by the participant will result in immediate expulsion of that team from the game and possible disciplinary action against the individual.

 

Should such an incident occur, an official written complaint from the affiliated club appointed grounds official for that event must be forwarded, through their Club President, to the BNJCA Secretary. The submissions and complaint will then be reviewed by the BNJCA Discipline Committee for possible further disciplinary action. This may include but is not limited to:

  • Banning of that participant attending BNJCA organised games for a defined time or banning attendance from the remainder of that teams competition
  • Expulsion of the team from that competition
  • Deduction of points from the team for that particular game
  • Deduction of points from the team from the overall standings of the competition

 

When the BNJCA Discipline Committee hands down their decision, that particular decision is final.

 

Spectator involvement

 

No spectators within the immediate “playing arena” will be permitted to consume alcohol while a BNJCA cricket event is in progress, except at times and places specified by the affiliated club.  Should a spectator be suspected of consuming alcohol or suffering the obvious effects of alcohol in this area, the person/s will be asked to leave the sporting arena by the affiliated club ground official.

 

Refusal to cooperate by the spectator will result in immediate expulsion of that team from the game and possible disciplinary action against the individual. It is a responsibility of each affiliated club Delegate to ensure that their Club is made aware of the standard of behaviour expected at BNJCA cricket events.

 

Further disciplinary action may be taken, if so desired by the BNJCA, upon receipt of an official written complaint from either the Club official, opposition Club official or umpires appointed by BNJCA for that event. The submissions and complaints will then be reviewed by the BNJCA for further disciplinary action. This may include but is not limited to:

  • Banning of that spectator from other BNJCA events
  • Expulsion of the team from that competition
  • Deduction of points from the team for that particular game
  • Deduction of points from the team from the overall standings of the competition

 

Provision for Consumption at BNJCA Events

 

In particular cases where the BNJCA sees fit, permission may be given for spectators to consume alcohol at BNJCA events, namely, but not limited to, where affiliated clubs hold a Liquor licence and are required to abide by its terms and conditions.

 

A written submission from the Affiliated Club must be put to the BNJCA to allow for the consumption of alcohol at a BNJCA event, this includes affiliated clubs which hold a Liquor licence and are required to abide by its terms and conditions. First and foremost, any plans for serving alcohol MUST comply with the BNJCA Code of Conduct guidelines. The written submission to

 

BNJCA must include:

  • Brief overview of the purpose of the event e.g. Friday night Super Six games
  • Permits gained for the event i.e. licensing requirements
  • Specified area to be used for consumption

 

Based on criteria set by the BNJCA, submissions will be passed or rejected. A representative of the applicants may need to attend the BNJCA meeting to have the submission passed. Should a submission be passed, all aspects of the submission MUST be followed through or the below penalties may be applied. If organized consumption of alcohol by spectators occurs and there has been a failure to forward a submission for approval, the matter will be forwarded to the BNJCA for disciplinary action. This action may include but is not limited to:

  • Banning of that Club to serve alcohol at BNJCA events
  • Expulsion of the team from that competition
  • Deduction of points from the team for that particular game
  • Deduction of points from the team from the overall standings of the competition

 

It is vital that a submission is passed before any organized consumption of liquor occurs. Penalties will be enforced by the BNJCA and their decision will be final. Again, it is a responsibility of BNJCA Affiliated Club Delegates to inform their Clubs of these guidelines

 

Any BNJCA Affiliated Club failing to comply with the BNJCA Alcohol Policy will be investigated and disciplined by the BNJCA as it sees fit. These decisions will be determined by the BNJCA Discipline Committee and are Final.

 

Please note:

The playing arena is the area including the actual playing surface and any areas in which spectators could view the event, unless within a pre‐approved licensed area. For instance, the “playing arena” for a cricket match on an oval would require no consumption or effects of consumption to be visible anywhere on that particular Oval or adjacent areas (i.e. adjoining oval/s, grassed hill, under cover area etc).

 

 

Bullying

 

The appeal of the game of cricket in Australia is not just limited to its strong history, tradition and culture. It is also about the way the game is played. For this reason, Cricket Australia places a strong emphasis on players and officials adhering to the ‘Spirit of Cricket’, and the ‘Codes of Behaviour’.

 

There is also growing awareness in schools and junior sporting clubs about the need to recognise ‘bullying’. This can impact on the attitude of young people towards their sport. It can result in children wanting to leave their team or their sport; in parents not getting involved, and in a poor image for a team or club.

 

Along with the ‘Spirit of Cricket’ and the ‘Codes of Behaviour’, the BNJCA advocates that affiliated clubs institute an awareness campaign amongst their committees, parents and players.

 

What is Bullying?

 

Bullying is unacceptable behaviour and should not be tolerated. It can include name calling, constant criticism, racist remarks, threats, and unwelcome physical contact. It can also take the form of spreading rumours and excluding someone from activities.

 

On the sporting field, it can take the form of ‘put downs’ because of a players’ capability (can’t bat, can’t catch, can’t throw etc), or forming small team cliques which exclude the player.

 

The BNJCA believes it is the responsibility of club administrators, volunteer coaches and managers and parents to be aware of possible bullying. Many young children are reluctant to tell adults that they are being bullied. Older children are even more reluctant. This underlines the need for constant vigilance and encouragement to report bullying.

 

Bullying can occur:

  • Child to child - includes physical aggression, verbal bullying (picking on another child), intimidation, damage to property, and isolation
  • Adult to child - includes repeated gestures or expressions of a threatening or intimidatory nature, or any comment intended to degrade the child (including those about performance).
  • Child to adult - includes repeated gestures or expressions of a threatening or intimidatory nature by an individual child or a group of children

 

The BNJCA recommends all affiliated clubs develop an anti-bullying policy, which at least includes the following measures:

  • Awareness of bullying as an unacceptable form of behaviour
  • A club ethos which encourages children to report bullying
  • A complaints mechanism to address this problem
  • Good supervision policies at junior cricket venues
  • A supportive environment for victims of bullying
  • The co-operation of parents/guardians to counter bullying

 

BNJCA Anti-Bullying Policy

 

The BNJCA expects players and officials to respect the ‘Spirit of Cricket’ and the Laws of Cricket, and to adhere to the Australian Sports Commission Codes of Behaviour for players, parents, coaches and administrators. These are printed in the ’Allrounder’.

 

The Association does not condone physical or verbal abuse of any form in the junior cricket environment.
The BNJCA recommends affiliated clubs initiate an awareness program within their committee and amongst all volunteer coaches, managers and scorers. Clubs should also institute a complaints process to deal effectively with any bullying behaviours. A recommended complaints framework would:

  • Encourage bullying to be reported to the team manager or the club secretary.
  • Record the complaint. Get both sides of the story from the victim and alleged bully. Talk to witnesses and inform parents.
  • Decide on any sanction (this could range from mediation, verbal warning, written warning, temporary or permanent ban from club)
  • Make sure there is right of appeal.

 

The BNJCA anticipates any ‘bullying’ matters would be dealt with in the club environment. It is not envisaged the Association would become involved unless it involves an inter-club dispute.

 

 

BNJCA Disputes Process

 

Primarily, disputes and the subsequent discipline process arise when a player, official or parent witnesses behaviour that, in their opinion, breaches either the laws of the game, the spirit of the game, one or more BNJCA policies, or common law. The Disputes and Discipline procedure is used when a matter cannot be resolved, in a timely manner, to the satisfaction of player, team or club.

 

Please note that disputes between spectators or parents at a game or at training must be resolved by the clubs concerned as BNJCA has no jurisdiction over people who are not players, coaches or officials.

 

This policy covers how the dispute and discipline process is to be conducted. In making these determinations, the BNJCA does not need to abide by any specific legal requirement or process. However, there are three basic principles of natural justice that are followed by the tribunal to ensure a fair and equitable process is achieved:

  • Notification of the charge - the person accused should receive notice of, and know the nature of the allegations made against them.
  • Opportunity to respond - the person accused should be given the opportunity to respond to the allegations.
  • Decision-makers to be unbiased - there should not be any preconceived opinions, vested interests or personal involvement of the tribunal members.

 

A tribunal is not expected to act as a court of law, but should conduct the hearing as quickly, informally and comprehensively as practicable. There is no right to legal representation at a Tribunal hearing.

 

Should an incident arise that cannot be resolved by rational discussion between officials, the person wishing to make the complaint must do so in writing to their own Club President within 7 days.

 

The letter must be clearly stated, providing a detailed description of the incident(s) and what policy or law is said to be in breach, with specific reference to the rule(s) alleged to have been broken. This detail is required in order to enable the other club concerned to prepare their response and they should be able to examine the evidence upon which the allegations against them are made.

 

The complaint must also contain what you, the team and/or club would like to happen, in order to have this issue resolved to your satisfaction.

 

The Club President is then responsible for forwarding a copy of this complaint letter, within 7 days, to the Club President of the other club involved, and to the BNJCA Secretary.

 

Presidents of the clubs concerned are then required to communicate with each other to discuss and resolve the matter. Clubs are advised that if the matter involves a person under the age of 18 years, it is strongly recommended that a parent or guardian is allowed to accompany and assist them when you examine the allegations against the person.

 

If either Club President is not satisfied with the outcome or no resolution can be found within 21 days of the matter being referred to the other club, the dissenting Club President shall, within 7 days, refer the matter to the BNJCA Secretary, preferably via email, and request a Tribunal hearing.

 

The referring club must detail reasons for the referral, including why no resolution has been possible. It must also provide a detailed description of the incident(s) and what policy or law is said to be in breach, with specific reference to the rule(s) alleged to have been broken and supply all documentation it has received from all parties involved.

 

The BNJCA Secretary will convene a Tribunal hearing within 30 days of the matter being referred by the dissenting Club President. The BNJCA Tribunal will consist of three (3) current BNJCA Management Committee members, including the President as Chairperson.

 

The other club(s) involved will be requested by the BNJCA Secretary, to make a written submission to the Tribunal; such submission to be received by the BNJCA Secretary within 14 days of the request being made. This written submission is in addition to the documentation previously submitted by the referring Club President.  This submission must address the specific incident(s) involved and if it is a dispute, detail why no resolution can be achieved. If no documentation is forwarded to the BNJCA Secretary by the other party to the dispute, the Tribunal will only review what is before it.

 

It is worthwhile considering at this stage, whether a case is suitable for mediation and if so the Tribunal should offer this to all parties before they announce a decision and sanction. Many complaints arise out of misunderstandings between individuals that could be more effectively resolved outside the dispute process.

 

The Tribunal may make whatever further enquiries it deems appropriate to clarify the basis of the complaint, including contacting witnesses. Hearsay evidence can be considered by a Tribunal if it is considered reliable, applicable and appropriate.

 

There is no legal obligation however for witnesses to disclose relevant information, or even answer certain questions during a hearing. There is no requirement for the Tribunal to physically meet to resolve the dispute.

 

The Tribunal has first to consider the facts presented to it. After reviewing the case for both sides the members must decide whose evidence they accept and to what extent. Decisions should also be arrived at on the reasonable satisfaction of the Tribunal members or on the ‘balance of probabilities’ (that is, more probable than not). However, in most disciplinary cases there is a “sliding scale” under which the more serious the charge, the higher the degree of satisfaction required.

 

Once the investigation has been completed and the evidence evaluated, the Tribunal must make a decision and there is one vote per Tribunal member and a simple majority decision is acceptable. Once a decision is reached as to whether a complaint is upheld or an allegation is substantiated, an appropriate sanction/penalty may be imposed.

 

At the time a dispute is referred to the BNJCA Secretary, the referring Club includes in the documentation a statement of what they would like to happen to have the issue resolved to their satisfaction. The Tribunal must take this request into account before determining the appropriate sanction/penalty.

 

The decision of the Tribunal shall be made within 45 days of the dispute being referred to the BNJCA Secretary. The Tribunal decision and sanction/penalty will be advised in writing, which may include email, within 7 days, to the relevant Club Presidents. It is considered good practice for Tribunals to outline the reasons for any decisions that are made but it is up to each Tribunal to determine if it will do this.

 

Any penalty imposed by a Tribunal must be reasonable under the circumstances of the case or issue (that is, the ‘punishment’ fits the ‘crime’).

 

 

Disciplinary Sanctions

 

Sanctions/penalties which may be imposed by a BNJCA Tribunal may include, but are not restricted to, any of the following:

  • Non-attendance at club games for a time period or number of games.
  • Not being permitted to be a Coach or Official for a time period or number of games.
  • Player suspension for a time period or number of games.
  • Game result may be altered.
  • Team to lose points in the relevant competition.
  • Club to lose points in the Club Premiership.

 

The decision and sanction/penalty imposed by the Tribunal shall be final and binding on all concerned and no further appeal process is available.

 

 Level of OffenceMinimum Sanction for First BreachMaximum Sanction for First Breach Maximum Sanction for a Subsequent Breach within 18 Months 
1Warning/Reprimand 1 day2 days
1 day2 days4 days
4 days8 days1 year
8 days1 yearLifetime

 

The sanctions handed down for a breach of the code of behaviour by the Dispute and Discipline Committee will only apply to matches operated by BNJCA.

 

Where a sanction is listed in days, this will apply to the number of consecutive competition days where

  • a player cannot participate in a game
  • an official cannot interact with his own team or the opposition players, officials or parents
  • a parent cannot interact with or come within 50 metres of any other person at the ground

 

Where a sanction is listed in years, this will mean no attendance at any BNJCA event for the number of calendar years from the date of the offense; player, official or parent.

 

A lifetime sanction for a player refers to their playing lifetime and will expire once they are no longer eligible to play in any BNJCA match.

 

A lifetime sanction for an official or parent means that they will not be able to attend any BNJCA match.
Level 3 breaches where the sanction handed down is greater than 6 days and all Level 4 breaches will be reported to 
Queensland Cricket.